On Rushing Water

Alys Jenkins and Tom Sewell
11 August - 2 September 2017

On Rushing Water is an exhibition of new work by Alys Jenkins and Tom Sewell drawing on the influence of eastern philosophy on their practice. The exhibition marks one year of Dye House 451.

 

An enquiry may reveal the potential of an object not simply as evidence of activity, but as an extrusion of condition. By sensing the world around us we establish a relative frame of reference which enables us to situate and understand ourselves. We create space in order to navigate this world.

 

Before enlightenment, mountains are mountains and waters are waters. During the quest for enlightenment, mountains are not mountains and waters are not waters. After enlightenment, mountains are just mountains and waters are just waters.’

 

A monk asked Joshu, "Does a newborn infant also have six consciousnesses?"

Joshu said, "A ball tossed on rushing water"

The monk went onto ask Toshi, "What is the meaning of 'a ball tossed on rushing water?"

Toshi said, "Moment to moment nonstop flow"

Subtle responses to conditions without existence, the mind repeatedly activated in relation to objects,

this is the realm of mindlessness.  Watch it and you'll go blind.

When you've completely perfectly comprehended, theres nothing to comprehend; in the dark, abstruse,

hidden place, you still must be rebuked.  All things are thoroughly complrehanded and all beings are

clearly understood - when one who has arrived senses this, they are startled in the darkness

On Rushing Water

Blue Cliff Record, Case 80

 

 

 

An enquiry may reveal the potential of an object not simply as evidence of activity, but as an extrusion of condition.  By sensing the world around us we establish a relative frame of reference which enables us to situate and understand ourselves.  We create space in order to navigate this world.

But what of those space we  do not access?  That hidden inverted space, the In Between.  These are real spaces we might reveal.  These spaces pose questions about what it is we look at and what is and is not seen.

Both the body and the object have become sites for the exercise and regulation of power.  Our experience is rooted in the images of representation, we judge the boundaries of form and engage in it's regulation.  We set ourselves apart and sacrifice that pours margin.  But this meeting of matter is central to the intuition of perception.  Something not to conquer, but to remind us of our independence from our regulated containments.  Growth and degradation, the Intermediate and the Transient.  The reverberations of these shifting conditions present the possibility to engage beyond the object and into other realms of experience.  But if we can liberate ourselves and the object from the passivity of looking, both subject and object, continually in process, are neither fixed entities not autonomous beings outside the history and representation of identity.  We find the potential to restructure.

Objects are records.  Totemic when demanding neither attention nor dignity.  They may portray a human implication, they may aspire to a memorialisation.  They are memories, intrinsically about exposure, impermanence and the venerability of desire and exchange. 

Alys Jenkins (b.1985) lives and works in London.  She completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art at the Byam Shaw School of Art and a Btec in Kiln Formed Glass, having studied BA Contemporary History at the University of Sussex and a Foundation in Drawing at Camberwell.

Alys works in a range of sculptural media with a focus on the intermediate or industrial materials such as wax, vinamold, latex, plaster, concrete and float glass.  She works around the detritus of her studio, feeding discarded process back into the narrative of discourse and investigation.  Her communications are rooted in an emotive exercise, informed by the study of identity politics, marginal histories and phenomenology.  In 2015 she traveled to Japan to study the practice of Shingon Buddhism.